Fanclub x Cision Webinar: Influencer Marketing

As geeks, we're always seeking out new ways to make our work more effective. Over the last few years, we've adapted how we work to leverage new, effective ways to help clients engage with the decision-making process of their customers.

Helping our clients set up and manage their influencer strategies is one way that we're trying to redefine what PR means today.

We believe that PR is the marketing discipline that is best placed to understand and deliver influencer marketing for clients, and we want to share our learnings with the industry, and help PRs adapt their skill-set to ensure that we're well-positioned to deliver this service in the future.

We'd love to share what we've learned with. On August 29th, 3pm-4pm, Emily and Adrian will be hosting a webinar with Cision about how to adapt your PR skills to power influencer marketing.

If you're interested, sign up at this link here.

We hope you'll join us.


Why coffees and good content are more important than ever in PR

There’s been a lot of talk about General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in marketing press, but less so in PR press - even though there’s room for it to affect all of us in this industry. If you don’t know what the GDPR is, then you should.

 

So, what is it?

The EU’s GDPR, to help organisations understand new legal frameworks, will come into full effect in May 2018 for both B2B and B2C communications.

From a series of new rules which will govern marketing data, the most pressing one for the industry is the need for ‘explicit consent’ from the recipient of a marketing email as well as the consent to be verifiable; in other words, having records showing the origin of the data.

The fine is hefty. Seriously hefty. It’s four per cent of global revenue or €20 million, whichever is bigger. Ouch.

 

And what’s it got to do with PR?

Unfortunately, some PRs are still guilty of sending out very sales-y press releases / e-alerts / emails which could be deemed as marketing content. For example, if you send out mail-merges of hundreds of pitch emails to try and secure coverage, then you may hit a pissed-off journalist who will deem your email as unsolicited marketing content. If they’re really pissed-off, they might flag this under the new regulations. If you can’t then prove you have consent to contact this person, you’ll be in a tricky situation. If you’re asked for a copy of the data and you don’t have it, then we’re slipping further out of the grey area and more into the red.

 

Essentially, we’re not completely sure what it means for us as PRs yet, but we had better start researching and preparing ourselves for the worst.

 

What do we do to protect ourselves?

Firstly (and this should be something all PRs are doing anyway), make sure you are providing journalists with good content that is relevant to them. Every PR event with journalist speakers and every PR / journalist forum, and I mean every single one, has a takeaway of the same message: do your research and stop pitching blindly with things that are irrelevant.

 

Yes, we are time pressed, but so are journalists- probably more so. Yes, sometimes it’s not always our own personal faults, but we should be finding time to look over our media lists and making sure we are targeting the right people with the right story. It’s in our interests, our clients’ interests and the journalist’s interests. Start prepping now and take that extra time to find those people that are relevant to your sectors, clients and pitch topics. You also need to make sure your content is quality content, and not a sales pitch. If someone requests that you destroy their data and never contact them again, then you must oblige under the new regulations- that’s a contact gone for good.

 

Secondly, work on building relationships with your key contacts. If you genuinely have something to offer them then there’s no reason why the journalist wouldn’t want to meet up and build a relationship with you. So, get networking (without taking a sales pitch along with you).

 

Thirdly, and finally, start logging your consent as if you were a marketing agency. Although this is a huge grey area, there’s no harm in beginning to prepare yourself and getting one step ahead.

 

Take a read of PR Week's story too discussing GDPR, which inspired us to blog about the regulation.


Dates for your 2017 calendar

From National Pie Week to Learn Your Name in Morse Code Day, it can be hard to keep up with what’s happening and what’s important.

But, don’t fear! We’ve poured over the calendars, and found the key dates every PR person needs to know for 2017 as well as a few extras to help spark those creative ideas.

You can thank us later! (Perhaps with a puppy on National Dog Day in August).

 

January:

Blue Monday (16th)

National Hug Day (21st)

Chinese New Year (28th)

 

February:

World Cancer Day (4th)

National Pizza Day (9th)

Valentine’s Day (14th)

The Oscars (26th)

Mobile World Congress (27th – 2nd March)

Pancake Day (28th)

 

March:

St David’s Day (1st)

British Pie Week (6th – 12th)

International Women’s Day (8th)

Beauty and the Beast film release (17th)

International Day of Happiness (20th)

CeBit (20th – 24th)

Mother’s Day (26th)

 

April:

April Fools Day (1st)

Good Friday (14th)

Easter Sunday (16th)

Easter Monday (17th)

Facebook F8 (18th – 19th)

Queen Elizabeth 2nd birthday (21st)

London Marathon, St Georges Day and Shakespeare Day (23rd)

 

May:

Eurovision (13th)

 

June:

UEFA Champions League Final (3rd)
Apple WWDC 2017 Keynote Address – Info TBC (12th)

Father’s Day (18th)

Glastonbury Festival (21st – 25th)

Royal Ascot (21st – 24th)

 

July:

Tour de France (1st – 23rd)

Wimbledon (3rd -16th)

British Golfing Open (20th – 23rd)

 

August:

Edinburgh Fringe (4th – 28th)

International Friendship Day (7th)

Film release: Emojimovie (11th)

Notting Hill Carnival (also National Dog Day) (26th – 27th)

 

September:

IFA, Berlin (1st – 6th)

International Day of Peace (21st)

Jeans for Genes Day (23rd)

 

October:

LinkedIn’s Talent Connect (3rd – 5th)

National Work Life Week (3rd – 7th)

National Animal Day (4th)

World Smile Day (6th)

International Chocolate Week and International Curry Week (9th – 15th)

HR Technology Conference (10th – 13th)

International Baking Week (16th – 22nd)

World Food Day (16th)

Halloween (31st)

 

November:

World Vegan Day (1st)

Guy Fawkes (5th)

Remembrance Sunday (12th)

World Kindness Day (13th)

International Men’s Day (19th)

Universal Children’s Day (20th)

Road Safety Week (21st – 27th)

Thanksgiving (23rd)

Black Friday (24th)

Cyber Monday (27th)

St Andrews Day (30th)

 

December:

First day of advent (3rd)

Hanukkah (13th – 20th)

Film release: Star Wars (15th)

Christmas Eve (24th)

Christmas Day (25th)

Boxing Day (26th)

New Year’s Eve (31st)

 

 


What the launch of Amazon Video Direct means for marketers

By Sarah Boulton

Well, quite honestly we will have to wait and see, but it basically means that there will be yet another way to target and engage with consumers, as it is setting itself up big time to compete with YouTube.

If you missed the announcement yesterday, here’s the basics: Amazon launched its new self-serve programme, called Amazon Video Direct, which allows anyone with an Amazon Prime account to distribute videos directly on Amazon’s video platform.

It’s huge news for multi-channel networks and individual content creators, as it offers a new, alternative revenue stream outside of YouTube, which currently takes a 45% cut of all ad revenue generated on its platform. Networks and big vlogger stars are constantly looking at new platforms to launch on in order to build a stronger, more sustainable business and Amazon’s new service could be the answer.

Amazon has said it will distribute a share of $1m per month as a bonus to the top 100 titles hosted on Prime through Video Direct on top of any other revenue earned through content. But, is it enough on the face of it to beat YouTube at its own game? Its not really offering any extra incentive to post or view content. And, it will have to charm some big name content creators over to the platform and that will not be cheap!

The one thing we definitely know Amazon has, is scale and ambition, (well that’s two things but who’s counting), so we’ll be keeping a close eye at who pops up on the platform and will be sure to keep you updated. Stay tuned.

Why not drop us an email to see how we currently work with content creators on our integrated PR campaign: hello@fanclubpr.com