By Adrian Ma

When it comes to mental health, PR doesn’t get a good rep. In various reports it ranks in the top 10 most stressful careers out there.

Throughout my career, I’ve seen the casualties first hand. It’s not pretty. I wanted to do something to safeguard the team’s mental health, and here at Fanclub, we’ve been working with our in-house coach Tash (pictured).

Here she is to tell us a bit about her role, and what she does for us.

What’s your role here?

My role at Fanclub is about helping people to be the best version of themselves. I work with to them remove any interference that may be stopping them from achieving their full potential: from dealing with high pressure situations; to finessing client relationships and more smoothly negotiating team personalities.  Essentially it’s about bolstering people’s emotional understanding and awareness so they can feel increasingly strong, confident and comfortable within themselves to make the right decisions and excel at a higher level.   

What qualifies you for this? 

I worked in PR for over twelve years at companies including Hill & Knowlton and Freuds’ before becoming a professional coach, so I understand the many trials and tribulations of the industry and the issues that affect people within it.  I have also put in the hours and gained an advanced practitioner qualification in Life Coaching and NLP with the Phil Parker Institute as well as doing additional courses to improve my knowledge with the Co-Active coaching school.

How do you do what you do? 

I always start of from the basic assumption that I’m OK and that the people I’m working with are OK too.  It’s my view that labelling people is inherently counterproductive and that if employees are stuck or always butting heads with the same problem, then something about the way they are dealing with it needs to change, and I help facilitate that change.  As the saying goes: the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. So I get people to look at their issues in an entirely new way, to gain new ideas about how to work with and overcome them.

In your career, and in your practice, do you come across common issues in people who work in PR?

Absolutely, managing tricky client relationships, dealing with high stress situations and imposter syndrome are all very common. 

What advice would you give them for dealing with it? 

In terms of managing tricky client relationships it’s key to put yourselves in their shoes.  We get too caught up in “me, myself and I” and can feel we are being attacked and disrespected by people.  But in most cases it’s just not the case and many clients are just acting into the “script” of how they feel they should behave. What’s key is to start giving people the tools to move away from reaction and into understanding.

With managing high stress situations it’s about clearly identifying your triggers so you can become hyper aware of looking out for them and understand it’s a pattern that can be hacked, not a helpless loop.

And with managing imposter syndrome it’s about communication, communication, communication.  It’s my belief that this so called epidemic of our age is caused by the strange social syndrome of feeling that talking about our insecurities is a weakness.  The sooner you have a group of employees together saying ‘me too’ the sooner you have a more relaxed, happy workforce that feels understood and part of a group, not like imposters. In fact, group coaching is the latest tool that I’m working on building out for my business clients.